BHT Book Club

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Next Book Club selection - Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg 

The next Beth Hillel Temple Book Club meeting will be Monday, September 12, at 7 PM at the home of Susan Remson.

 

Our book selection is Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik.

 

"You can't spell truth without Ruth.

Only Ruth Bader Ginsburg can judge me.

The Ruth will set you free.

 

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg never asked for fame—she was just trying to make the world a little better and a little freer. But along the way, the feminist pioneer's searing dissents and steely strength have inspired millions.”

From http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25422234-notorious-rbg

 

Happy Summer Reading!

The April meeting will be held at the home of Linda Selsberg. The book will be I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai. Malala is the young Pakastani girl who stood up for education and was shot by the Taliban.

As always, guests are welcome at meetings.

The next selection for the BHT Book Club is:
Between the World and Me: by Ta Nehisi Coates

The Beth Hillel Temple Book Club will have a joint discussion with First United Methodist Church at the church. The book, which has been on the New York Times Best Seller List for many weeks, is a memoir written as a series of letters to Coates' teenage son. Coates is known for his thoughtful and influential writing on race in America and will provide the basis for a discussion on that topic. All Beth Hillel members are invited to attend this important discussion.

First United Methodist Church, 60th Street and Sheridan Rd, Kenosha, 7:00pm.

The next selection for the BHT Book Club is: 

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee.

Meeting is at the home of Esther Letven at 7:00pm.

The next selection for the BHT Book Club is:
The Paris Architect: A Novel by Charles Belfoure

In 1942 Paris, gifted architect Lucien Bernard accepts a commission that will bring him a great deal of money - and maybe get him killed. But if he's clever enough, he'll avoid any trouble. All he has to do is design a secret hiding place for a wealthy Jewish man, a space so invisible that even the most determined German officer won't find it. He sorely needs the money, and outwitting the Nazis who have occupied his beloved city is a challenge he can't resist.

But when one of his hiding spaces fails horribly, and the problem of where to hide a Jew becomes terribly personal, Lucien can no longer ignore what's at stake. The Paris Architect asks us to consider what we owe each other, and just how far we'll go to make things right.

Written by an architect whose knowledge imbues every page, this story becomes more gripping with every soul hidden and every life saved.

Our discussion will take place on July 14 at 7:00 pm at the home of Alice Thomson.  All are welcome to join us.

The next BHT Book Club will be on Monday, October 5th @ 7:00 pm at the home of Judith Warren.

The nonfiction book that we will be discussing is: (It is 649 pages!!)
And the Dead Shall Rise (2003) by Steve Oney

In 1913, 13-year-old Mary Phagan was found brutally murdered in the basement of the Atlanta pencil factory where she worked. The factory manager, a college-educated Jew named Leo Frank, was arrested, tried, and convicted in a trial that seized national headlines. When the governor commuted his death sentence, Frank was kidnapped and lynched by a group of prominent local citizens.

Steve Oney's acclaimed account re-creates the entire story for the first time, from the police investigations to the gripping trial to the brutal lynching and its aftermath. Oney vividly renders Atlanta, a city enjoying newfound prosperity a half-century after the Civil War, but still rife with barely hidden prejudices and resentments. He introduces a Dickensian pageant of characters, including zealous policemen, intrepid reporters, Frank's martyred wife, and a fiery populist who manipulated local anger at Northern newspapers that pushed for Frank's exoneration. Combining investigative journalism and sweeping social history, this is the definitive account of one of American history's most repellent and most fascinating moments.

APRIL FOOD OF THE MONTH: Raisins.  

In addition, feel free to bring unopened "chametz" before Passover begins--through April 9 only please. The non-perishables will be taken to the Shalom Center Food Pantry before the holiday begins.
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